Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘gerald abraham’

We’ve been away a while – busy times at Faber Towers, not least in respect of big new plans for the Finds list – and so news updates around this parish have been in short supply. But here is the roll-call of the titles just reissued this month (with another batch to follow!)
FICTION
I’m All Right Jack by Alan Hackney
The Papers of A. J. Wentworth, B.A. by H. F. Ellis
The Killing of Cinderella by Christopher Lee
Fables by T. F. Powys
It Was the Nightingale by Henry Williamson
NON-FICTION
A Curious Life for a Lady by Pat Barr
Lloyd George (Volume 4: War Leader 1916-18) by John Grigg
A Pre-Raphaelite Circle by Raleigh Trevelyan
Riviera by Jim Ring
Mr Secretary Peel by Norman Gash
Studies in Russian Music by Gerald Abraham

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Here is a roll-call of the most recently reissued titles in Finds, now available to order from our site and on Amazon:
The Deer Cry Pavilion: A Story of Westerners in Japan 1868-1905 by Pat Barr
The pavilion in question, the Rokumeikan, became a symbol of Japan’s westernisation during the Meiji period of the late 1800s/early 1900s: designed by English architect Josiah Conder for the housing of government guests and the hosting of grand parties. The Rokumeikan made for one sort of lightning-rod amid the rush of foreigners into newly-‘enlightened’ Japan, but Pat Barr tells the tales of umpteen others in this richly fascinating study.
The Double Bond – Primo Levi: A Biography by Carole Angier
The anguished life of Primo Levi is explored with uncommon acuity in this powerful biography which was lauded on first publication in the Independent (Lesley Chamberlain) and Guardian (Blake Morrison).
Explaining Hitler: The Search for the Origin of His Evil by Ron Rosenbaum
The meditative work that, inter alia, inspired Norman Mailer’s final novel The Castle in the Forest – Mailer saying of Rosenbaum’s work that it “stimulated the hell out of me, absolutely knocked me out…”
“Personal without being self-indulgent, erudite without being pedantic, written with passion and a moral engagement worthy of its momentous subject, ‘Explaining Hitler’ is an exemplary work of intellectual journalism, an idiosyncratic classic.” Gary Kamiya, Salon.
Science in History: Volume 4, The Social Sciences by J. D. Bernal
The concluding volume of Bernal’s exceptional survey.
The East End: Four Centuries of London Life by Alan Palmer
Palmer’s homage to a vanished quarter of the capital.
Erskine Childers by Jim Ring
Authoritative study of the prominent Irish nationalist and author of Riddle of the Sands.
Queen Victoria by Giles St Aubyn
Masterly biography of the great British monarch.
Essays on Russian and East European Music by Gerald Abraham
A set of essays including the first publication of “The Opera of Stanislaw Moniuszko”.
Follow My Black Plume by Geoffrey Trease
Rip-roaring fiction for young readers, about an English lad getting caught up in Giuseppe Garibaldi’s fight for Italian independence.
The Innocent Moon by Henry Williamson
Volume 9 of A Chronicle of Ancient Sunlight
The Greater Trumps by Charles Williams
Another of Williams’ unsettling supernatural fictions, this one deriving its threat from the Tarot.
The Killing of Sally Keemer by Christopher Lee
The second of Lee’s ‘Bath Detective’ series
Da Silva Da Silva’s Cultivated Wilderness and Genesis of the Clowns by Wilson Harris
A fictional diptych from the great Guyanan novelist

Read Full Post »